The FLDS – Our greatest missed missionary oppurtunity!

Is there any group of people on the Earth today that should be easier to baptize than the FLDS?

They already have a testimony of Joseph Smith and the BoM. They already have a testimony of Brigham Young and John Taylor. All we have to do is convince them that Wilford Woodruff really was a prophet, and they’re in. They probably haven’t ever really prayed to find out if the LDS church is true, and if they did, they must be close enough to the Holy Ghost for God to testify to them of their error.

Instead of sending missionaries to areas of the world with incredibly low rates of conversion and huge cultural and religious obstacles (Japan?), we should be blitzing Colorado City, where everyone is a dry Mormon with the same concern to resolve.

4 Comments

Filed under Doctrines, Teachings, Policies and Traditions

4 Responses to The FLDS – Our greatest missed missionary oppurtunity!

  1. Goldarn

    Many are the times I’ve heard LDS leaders claim that the inactives are the low hanging fruit of possible conversions, because they already have a testimony, they’ve just misplaced it (or something like that). Surely, the FLDS would be the next in line, since they’ve got most of a testimony, up until Woodruff’s day.

    • Cinepro

      Exactly. They’re so close! A lot closer than the non-Christians that seem to be resisting our missionary efforts surprisingly well.

  2. MC

    I think you’ve got it exactly backwards. None of the standard LDS proselytizing methods would be effective. All of the methods that Mormons view as “positive” would fall flat, because FLDS already have all the positives of Mormonism–eternal families, baptism by immersion, living prophets, the expanded canon of Mormon scripture, the theology, everything. It is, after all, just a branch of Mormonism.
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    So–instead of falling back on all the standard conversion tactics, an LDS missionary would have to resort to the kind of tactics that evangelicals use to convert Mormons–that is, to “go negative.” Evangelicals get nowhere trying to convert Mormons by telling them to “come to Christ.” “I already have Christ in my life, thanks,” is all they get. So EVs have to resort to critiquing Mormonism–telling them why they have it wrong. And judging from the LDS response to EV “outreach” projects (which runs anywhere from annoyance to full-fledged persecution mode), that’s not a very effective way to convert anyone.
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    Also, FLDS are fundamentalists–it’s even in their name! The low-hanging fruit for conversion to any ideology are definitely not the die hard, true believers of another ideology. You don’t go looking for Democrat votes at a Republican convention. You look for the apathetic and unaffiliated.

  3. Adam

    I wonder if the Sunni are saying the same things about the Shia, and vice versa. Reminds me of the old joke:
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    Once I saw this guy on a bridge about to jump. I said, “Don’t do it!” He said, “Nobody loves me.” I said, “God loves you. Do you believe in God?”
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    He said, “Yes.” I said, “Are you a Christian or a Jew?” He said, “A Christian.” I said, “Me, too! Protestant or Catholic?” He said, “Protestant.” I said, “Me, too! What franchise?” He said, “Baptist.” I said, “Me, too! Northern Baptist or Southern Baptist?” He said, “Northern Baptist.” I said, “Me, too! Northern Conservative Baptist or Northern Liberal Baptist?”
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    He said, “Northern Conservative Baptist.” I said, “Me, too! Northern Conservative Baptist Great Lakes Region, or Northern Conservative Baptist Eastern Region?” He said, “Northern Conservative Baptist Great Lakes Region.” I said, “Me, too!”
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    Northern Conservative Baptist Great Lakes Region Council of 1879, or Northern Conservative Baptist Great Lakes Region Council of 1912?” He said, “Northern Conservative Baptist Great Lakes Region Council of 1912.” I said, “Die, heretic!” And I pushed him over.

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